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Author Topic: Meaning of the lyrics  (Read 3921 times)

Offline KaraokeKing

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Re: Meaning of the lyrics
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2010, 11:30:24 PM »
I used to duet "End of the world" with  a very famous singer, and when she died, I wrote the words of that song on her flowers card.
You know ... it's taken me around 10 years to be able to sing that song again without blubbing.

Other songs I have trouble with if I am in the wrong frame of mind:
In the ghetto (seriously)!
Company (Dean Friedman)
Hushabye Mountain
You're a Thousand Miles Away (The Heartbeats)

*sniffle*

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Re: Meaning of the lyrics
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2010, 11:30:24 PM »

Offline DiscoLightsUK

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Re: Meaning of the lyrics
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2009, 11:49:06 PM »
Thanks Gazgoin for your advice too. You know it's weird how the human memory works isn't it? Maybe a song, a tune, an image or a smell will bring back all kinds of memories and emotions. But I definitely agree with what you said about it being only a sentence or 2 that can trigger the emotional outburst. It's like a shock to the system when you are singing along and then the words just hit you, because you never read deeper into the meaning behind it before. I suppose I should just try to gracefully accept that it's part of growing older, wiser, more mature! And may be start doing Karaoke in foreign languages where it doesn't matter what the words mean - then it can't affect me! Although music without words can also be really powerful and moving can't it! Born to try (Delta Goodrem) is a good one.

Offline gazcoin

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Re: Meaning of the lyrics
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2009, 01:17:55 PM »
KrazyKat this is tremendous advice, I also felt the same way after a series of break ups and kept feeling my mind wandering to that sad place again, it wasnt so much a particular song, but any song where a sentence or two of the lyrics really hit home. Being on the otherside now, the best way to get through it is just through time and perseverance, no-one will judge you at home if you do cry. You have 2 children as well and this is also very emotionally draining, so maybe adding to it that you arent getting enough time for yourself? Just keep trying the songs and try to visualise yourself in a more positive light, think of where you are now and what you have acheived. Obviously don't ignore your feelings and past experiences as this defines us, but stay calm and positive and you hopefully will be ok :). Good luck!

Offline KrazyKat Admin

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Re: Meaning of the lyrics
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2009, 01:54:58 AM »
Hi Asfora,
NP, hope you get back to singing soon :-)

Offline DiscoLightsUK

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Re: Meaning of the lyrics
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2009, 02:24:09 PM »
Hi KrazyKat Admin
Thank you so much for taking the time to reply with this helpful advice. I'm definitely going to give your suggestions a go. I always envy/admire the people on shows like pop idol etc, the ones who don't get voted to stay but they get one last chance to sing, even though they know they're going home and their dreams have been shattered, but they still manage to belt out a great performance.

Offline KrazyKat Admin

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Re: Meaning of the lyrics
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2009, 03:13:16 AM »
Hi Asfora,

Although you may have moved on with your life, it sounds as if you may have a touch of depression or are overly sensitive to songs that include emotional sentiments you relate to - perfectly natural for anyone who has experienced a lot of hurt, but not so good when you want to sing without blubbering!!

As one who has also been similarly affected, I can relate and as a pro singer, have had to work on being able to sing again after particularly emotional periods.  I don't think you can ever totally stop being affected by lyrics of songs that remind you of your life experiences - nor should you as this would make for a very cold and detached person! However, if you want to be capable of enjoying a night of karaoke with friends, you will have to distance yourself somewhat and channel your emotion into performing the song in a way that is sensitive to the lyrics and meaning without allowing yourself to be so carried away that it affects you negatively.

To start with, spend time going over the songs that affect you the most - always do this when you are feeling great and on top of the world - then as the song puts you in that sad place, let the emotion out and don't worry about blubbing ... do this a few times in a row and put every ounce of the emotion you feel into the words as you sing them. Don't worry about the screechy sound either - just let it out. 

After awhile of doing this, start to change the way you sing the track - you may start to do this automatically after a few times as it is not easy to express emotions to that extreme level for long periods of time - try adding the opposite of the emotion the song makes you feel i.e., replace sadness with anger or happiness. End the session by singing another track - preferably something really cheerful and upbeat or fun and silly with a positive message that makes you feel great and then stop for the day.

Next time you sing the song, try to remember how it felt before and think about how you could use that emotion to do justice to the words in a way that an audience could relate to it and feel what the songwriter is trying to portray. Whilst this may be emotional, I found the more I sang songs that made me blubber, the easier it became not to tear up so much... especially when practising singing and imagining that there was an actual audience of strangers!  It takes time, some songs are easier than others and there are still a few that make me tear up when I hear them so still working on those ... but it is possible to de-sensitize yourself enough to be able to sing again without becoming over emotional!

It also helps considerably to listen and sing songs that make you feel happy or have an upbeat, cheerful and positive message that you can also relate to. After all - no one can change the past and your experiences are part of what makes us who we are. Although may still feel emotionally vulnerable at times, by moving on, you have grown stronger and able to empathise with others.  When you look at things from that perspective it makes you realise that whilst we are often adversely affected by love and hurt, we should also be thankful for what we have and acknowledge that not only do these experiences teach us lessons about ourselves and others, but also when life and love is good, it would be pretty boring without them ;-)

Hope this helps!

Offline DiscoLightsUK

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Meaning of the lyrics
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2009, 09:15:52 AM »
Hi, I'm Asfora
I used to LOVE LOVE LOVE Karaoke when I was younger. I started when I was about 17 and every weekend for about 8 or 9 years, I've been to sing at Karaoke pubs or bars. But after a messy and heart breaking break up to my fiance a few years ago, whenever I tried to sing, the words in the songs just made my voice crack and I'd burst into tears. It is impossible for me to sing if I am in this emotional state, because my voice is not just trembly - it goes to a high screechy wail. It's just far too embarrassing. And that was quite a few years ago, and although I've moved on with my life and am now married with 2 children, whenever I try to sing a song (on online karaoke, seeing as I don't go out anymore) I read the lyrics and think about what the writer must have experienced to be able to write such sentiments, and I even think about other family members' life situations and how they've been affected by love and hurt, and I start blubbering. Maybe I'm getting soft in my old age. Has anyone else experienced this? And does it eventually go away or it there a cure? I used to have a powerful singing voice.

 


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